Lizard Squad Not Responsible For DDoS Attacks? (Updated)

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By Erwin Murillo – 25th August 2014
Lizard Squad Not Responsible For DDoS Attacks? (Updated)

Update: Purported hacker, FamedGod, released a video stating reasons as to why he supposedly targeted the PlayStation Network for the recent DDoS attacks. However, it has since been taken down. This article will be updated with any pertinent information when it is acquired.

As of right now, this story is still very much in development. Nothing is concrete yet, and there speculation is being thrown around the internet about who is actually responsible for the attacks. So take this information with caution, because no one is really sure yet. However, a few possibilities exist:

  • Lizard Squad actually is the group behind the DDoS attacks
  • FamedGod is actually the individual behind the PSN DDoS attacks
  • Lizard Squad/FamedGod is actually behind the attacks, but Lizard Squad/FamedGod is taking credit for it
  • Neither parties are behind the attacks, and it’s a different thing altogether

Stay tuned for more updates. GamerHeadlines.com will update this article as soon as accurate information is acquired regarding this matter.

The original story is below:


As reported previously, hacker group Lizard Squad claimed responsibility for the recent widespread DDoS attacks on servers belonging to PlayStation Network, Battle.net, and Riot Games’ League of Legends, among others.


Lizard Squad DDoS Attack: How It Works

Lizard Squad not responsible for DDoS attacks?


However, a startling new development has arisen. FamedGod, a member of the prominent hacker collective, Anonymous (responsible for the month-long PSN shutdown in 2010), is claiming his group to be the source of the data used in the DDoS spree that Lizard Squad spurred on. He states that he gained access to Sony’s “secure” server. He even provides proof.

Lizard Squad Vs. Anonymous?

FamedGod also claims to have been the reason Lizard Squad’s chat communication channel has been taken out of commission. Apparently, Lizard Squad utilized data used in previous hacks by Anonymous to set their diabolical plans in motion. FamedGod is now stating that memory dumps have been procured by Anonymous, and will be used to bring the PlayStation Network back online. But only on one condition, Twitter users must report Lizard Squad’s official Twitter account and get it banned.


Xbox Live Next on Lizard Squad List?

…next on Lizard Squad’s hit list?

On the other end of the spectrum, Lizard Squad has reportedly planned an attack against Xbox Live. Not surprisingly, Xbox Live users are reporting that the service has indeed been affected. The claims have also been supported by official Xbox Support.

Additionally, in a statement made by Sony Online Entertainment, the Federal Bureau of Investigation is now in the process of investigating what exactly is going on with this situation.

This story is still developing, and updates will be made as necessary.

What are your thoughts on this news? Are the DDoS attacks only being used to expose vulnerabilities of established game company’s services, or is it something greater? Is this an attack against the video game industry, or against its consumers? Let us know in the comments section below! As always, stay tuned to GamerHeadlines.com for the latest in video gaming and technology news.



Erwin Murillo

Erwin Murillo is a graduate of Union University. He has a Bachelor's of Science degree (Summa Cum Laude) in Exercise Science and Wellness/Sports Medicine, and is currently enrolled at The University of Tennessee Health Science Center's Occupational Therapy Program. As buff as he is nerdy, you can find him either throwing around iron in the gym, or working on his latest video game article...sometimes both. Follow him on Twitter @DesertFoxJr or email him at erwin.murillo@gamerheadlines.com.

  • Prof K.

    Guess I’m just playing Wii U games today.

  • JohnnyAppleseed

    FamedGod earlier tweeted that he was not responsible and was just mocking how easy it is to claim it and get noticed. Those tweets are now gone. I’d take it with a grain of salt.

    • He’s still sort of egging it on though, I’ll post an update with a disclaimer of sorts.

  • Peter Griffin

    I really wish people would not report things they knew absolutely nothing about. Every single piece of information in that picture can be obtained by just about anybody in the world, and also /for/ anybody in the world provided you have their IP address.

  • Matthew Pierson

    Getting really annoying, which I suppose is their goal. It seems that ddos protection would be a common sense thing when it comes to online games; so, in a way, I guess it’s good that they are exposing those vulnerabilities so that they can be addressed. I also saw some tweets earlier from other individuals saying that they are putting and end to lizardsquad’s antics, but I guess we’ll see.

    • I agree. You think Sony would have learned after the massive 2010 breach.

  • Ian Bunting

    They like the attention. DDOS’ing a terrorist group is not going to make the news. Target a popular gaming service and it sure will.

    • Alex Edwards

      Which to me is a problem with their point of view. Publicity isn’t worth much if you’re doing nothing constructive with the notoriety.